The Perfect Boiled Egg

March 2, 2009 | By | Comments (9)

Eggs

I’m pregnant, so in an effort to get the amount of protein I’m supposed to be having each day, I’ve opted to start off my morning with 2 boiled eggs. There are many variations out there of how to boil the perfect egg, without under-cooking it or over-cooking it, which can result in an unsightly green/gray rim around the yolk.

In my culinary school days at French Culinary Institute in NYC, we made many a Salade Nicoise, which (you guessed it) consists of boiled eggs. The French are very particular about their boiled eggs, and we practiced and practiced for days with the following formula for boiling the perfect egg: (read on for instructions)

* Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
* Add eggs to water carefully, to avoid cracking any shells.
* Boil for 11 minutes (this is when you need to pull out that kitchen timer!).
* Drain the hot water and shock the eggs in an ice bath.
* Cool eggs completely before peeling.

(Aside: Once, as punishment for talking too much during a
culinary class, I was forced to create 30 omelettes in front of the
entire class. As it turns out, the French are also very particular
about having no color on their omelettes. But that’s another post for
another day!)

Photo: Woodleywonderworks on Flickr.

COMMENTS

  1. Deana Pearse

    Yey for boiled eggs! They are indeed a great source of protein when you’re pregnant. You know, I’ve always admired the French for their attitude towards cooking. Their meticulousness never fails to produce outstanding dishes, and that’s what made their cuisine famous all over the world.

    April 26, 2011 at 10:30 pm
  2. Albert

    n my culinary school days at French Culinary Institute in NYC, we made many a Salade Nicoise, which (you guessed it) consists of boiled eggs

    February 12, 2011 at 3:00 am
  3. UGG Bailey Button

    It’s a Very helpful article for me. Actually, I am fond of reading online punjabi news. Thanks for writing such a complete ..And,I wantn’t to miss them.
    Thank you for sharing..

    January 3, 2011 at 11:27 pm
  4. cheap jordans

    Love is ever the beginning of knowledge as fire is of light.

    November 6, 2010 at 3:15 am
  5. cheap jordans

    Love is ever the beginning of knowledge as fire is of light.

    November 6, 2010 at 3:15 am
  6. Diana

    I am sorry for what seems to be a silly question, but do the eggs need to be room temperature, or does this recipe work for eggs out of the refrigerator? Thank you so much for your help.

    November 5, 2009 at 2:32 pm
  7. malinda

    I am looking at the egg issue as well and they do give an explanation for the Chalaza.
    It is the “anchor” to keep the yolk in the center of the egg.
    The more noticeable the chalaza the fresher the egg.

    July 11, 2009 at 4:18 pm
  8. Santha Dunn

    In your July 2009 issue of Cooking Light, page 44, you gave a name to the disgusting part of the egg…chalaza. My mom used to tell me that was the male chicken’s sperm, and she always removed it because it was grose to her too. I remove it as well, even though I now know it is not sperm. My mom-in-law has recently begun raising chickens, and they lay all the time (with NO rooster!) Therefore, I know it is not sperm! But what is it. You gave it a name but did not fully explain what it is. I’ve wondered if it is what will develop into the chickens backbone or something. Is there any nutritional value in it? Thanks for a reply! Also, you mentioned that the shell is calcium rich. Does anyone crush and eat the shell for the calcium? I do know we use the shell in composting because the calcium is good for the soil. THANKS!

    June 29, 2009 at 3:22 pm
  9. Shaun C

    Whoa… you guys at FCI had it hard! I am looking forward to trying this; Mark Bittman writes about using a soft-boiled egg as a easier alternative to a poached egg. But, I tried his method in How to Cook Everything for a soft-boiled egg and the white wasn’t yet set. Is the 11 minutes for a hard-boiled egg, or soft?

    March 2, 2009 at 6:07 pm

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