Tim Cebula

Recent Posts By Tim Cebula

Wellfleet Sea Salt: A Taste of the Cape

I miss my native Massachusetts most of all in the summer. Growing up, my summers were spent on the Cape, scarfing whole belly clams, lobster, and oysters, sweet-briny flavors that perfectly distilled Cape Cod’s terroir (merroir?). Alabama summers are different: My time is spent rushing from one air-conditioned environment to the next, hoping to dodge the inevitable—and often quite violent—daily […]

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What’s the Difference Between Over Easy, Over Medium, and Over Hard Eggs?

If you’ve been to a diner and ordered fried eggs, you know the server’s next question is, “How’d you like them, hon?” If you know the jargon, you’ll save your busy server time, and yourself a lot of unnecessarily detailed explaining. You have four options. Sunny-side up, as you probably know, is an unflipped fried egg, with the yolk still […]

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Four Flavorful Oils for Frying Eggs

Typically, you fry eggs in canola or vegetable oil: fats with neutral flavor and a high smoke point, meaning you can cook the egg at medium-high heat and not worry about the oil smoking and giving the egg off flavors. But you can easily add a little pizzazz to a simple fried egg by using flavored cooking oils. These oils […]

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Today’s Special: Johanna Ware’s Grilled Steak and Tomatoes with Creamy Tofu Ranch

Ripe heirloom tomatoes in the heart of the season make Johanna Ware swoon. “There couldn’t be anything I love more,” says the chef of Smallwares, in Portland, Oregon. “They’re sweet and juicy, and I almost cry when their season is over.” It doesn’t take much to make the most out of garden-fresh tomatoes: A little salt and fresh ground pepper […]

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Salad: Will It Grill?

Yes, silly! Flame-kissed greens are one of the best treats of the season. The grill gives salad lettuces depth and complexity: a hint of smoke, some subtle char, a little caramelization. Sadly, many folks don’t even consider it an option. The tricks: – Use sturdy lettuce. Think romaine, radicchio, even iceberg if that’s your thing. But butter lettuce will just […]

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Dessert: Will It Grill?

Of course it will! You just need to think outside the cake box. Start by understanding the limits of the grill: it can be used as a stovetop or an oven, but flame heat is fickle and can be hard to regulate. So you can’t, for instance, bake a cake on a grill. But you can grill slices of pound […]

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Salsa: Will It Grill?

If you think salsa isn’t a candidate for the grill, it may be because of logistical concerns: How can you keep all those diced veggies from falling through the grate into the fire? The simple solution is to keep them in large slices as they grill, then chop them afterward. (I’m sure you already figured that out, but a straw […]

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Global Ingredient: Achiote

When a spoonful of just one ingredient lends amazing depth to a dish, it becomes a secret weapon in your culinary arsenal. Achiote paste is just such an item: A Mexican blend of annatto seed, oregano, nutmeg, cinnamon, garlic, and vinegar, it lends smoky, tart, and musky notes that make simple dishes sublime. Work a teaspoon or two into marinades […]

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Today’s Special: Ken Oringer’s Watermelon Salad with Feta and Pickles

Certain ingredients perfectly embody a taste. Lemons are tart. Radicchio is bitter. And watermelon is sweet. Ken Oringer, chef of acclaimed Boston restaurant Clio, makes the argument that to eat watermelon on its own is to shortchange it. “As sweet as it is, you can get more dimensions out of watermelon by pairing it with opposing flavors,” he says. “It […]

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What is Mead and Why Is It So Hot Right Now?

Essentially wine made from honey fermented with water and yeast, mead is on its way to becoming the next big thing in the adult beverage world. It’s an ancient elixir, one of the first wines ever made, enjoyed by B.C. Romans and Vikings and even in parts of Asia. Old-school mead was said to be cloyingly sweet, perhaps fitting since […]

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