Tim Cebula

Recent Posts By Tim Cebula

Make Shichimi Your New Rave

  When you find a spice blend with the transformative, headturning power of, say, Gebhardt chili powder or Mexican achiote paste, you add it to your arsenal immediately. Japanese shichimi is just such a secret weapon. A mix of seven spices—including black and white sesame seeds, dried orange peel, Japanese peppers, dried ginger, and seaweed—it’s spicy, but not hot; floral, […]

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Why I Don’t Plan My Meals

No two cooks plan a like…some don’t plan at all! Senior food editor Tim Cebula explains his “I hate meal planning” approach. Take it away, Tim!  My appetite is a fickle mistress. I serve her as best I can, but it takes an open mind, a willingness to shop almost daily, and a family with tastes as shifting as my […]

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Now Peaking: Texas Red Grapefruit

  It’s a boast befitting the Lone Star State: No grapefruit grown anywhere in the world is as sweet, juicy, and doggone red as the Texas Ruby Red. Texas doesn’t bother growing white and pink ones anymore, since, well, they pale in comparison. Why the fuss? They have far less bitterness than other grapefruit, and the flesh is stunning. Don’t […]

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Today’s Special: Scott Crawford’s Apple-Sunchoke Salad with Smoked Trout and Cider Vinaigrette

If you’re not a big sunchoke fan, it’s probably only because you haven’t tried them yet. The knobby, gnarly, thin-skinned tubers, also misleadingly called Jerusalem artichokes (they’re not artichokes and have nothing to do with Jerusalem), offer beguilingly nutty, sweet flavor, and they are about to hit midseason form. “Sunchokes are one of those wonderful things home cooks aren’t familiar […]

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Looking for a New Holiday Dinner Tradition? Try Smoked Goose!

Roast goose, a traditional European Christmas entrée, has been savored in season by everyone from Jacques Pépin to ol’ Scrooge himself. Eastern Europeans like theirs smoked, and we find smoked goose breast makes a festive and delectable addition to party snack platters. South Dakota’s Schiltz ships some of the best. Keep Reading: Holiday Entrées Festive Holiday Sides Holiday Menus

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How Much Beef Tenderloin Should I Cook for My Holiday Gathering?

At Cooking Light, we allot 3 ounces cooked meat per serving, which takes into account 25 percent shrinkage of meat during cooking (meats lose mass and volume while they cook as fat renders, moisture evaporates, and muscles tighten). So the formula is simple: four ounces raw beef per person, and you can extrapolate endlessly. If you’re feeding four people, you […]

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Today’s Special: Seared Scallops with Chestnut Puree

As much as we consider chestnuts a classic American winter treat—think roasted chestnuts sold on Manhattan’s streets at Christmas, Nat King Cole songs, and the like—they’re a true old-world ingredient. At his Select Oyster Bar in Boston, seafood expert Michael Serpa serves up fish dishes with Mediterranean flair. So for him, pairing diver scallops and chestnut puree with a splash […]

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Holiday Helper: How Many Sides Should I Make for Thanksgiving?

A: Lots. Tons. Loads. Seriously, for many people, the sides are the stars of the Thanksgiving table. This is partly because turkey doesn’t excite some eaters, but mostly because traditional Thanksgiving side dishes are so darn delicious. The number of sides you prepare for the feast will largely be determined by the number of people you’re hosting, but there’s no magic […]

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What Is Hanger Steak?

Hanger steak is from the diaphragm of the cow. It’s also called the “butcher’s cut,” because savvy cleaver-wielders keep it for themselves, which tells you how delicious it is. And it’s hard to find, but if you’re fortunate enough to run into some, you’ll discover it’s quite a bit cheaper than premium cuts like ribeye or strip, though it actually packs […]

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What’s the Difference Between Flank and Skirt Steak?

What these two beef cuts share in common is that they come from the underside of the cow, but they both have distinctly different tastes and textures. Flank is the leanest of the two. It’s a good all-purpose beef cut, suitable for grilling, roasting, broiling, or sautéing. But because it’s so lean, it can be dry and tough if overcooked or sliced […]

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